George Harrison Wanted The Beatles’ ‘We Can Work It Out’ To Sound More German

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Paul McCartney has revealed that The Beatles’ “We Can Work It Out” was originally a country song. Subsequently, George Harrison decided that the piece should sound like a waltz. Paul revealed how the Beatles changed the track to fit George’s vision.

George Harrison of The Beatles | David Farrell / Contributor

George Harrison Wanted To Change The Beatles’ “We Can Work It Out” Tempo

In the 1997 book Paul McCartney: Many Years Away, Paul discussed the evolution of “We Can Work It Out”. “I wrote it as more up-tempo, country-western stuff,” he said. “Then, it’s George Harrison’s idea of ​​putting the middle in the time of the waltz, like a German waltz. It came on the session, it was one of the cases where the arrangement was done on the session.

The Beatles used an old instrument on “We Can Work It Out.” “The other thing that happened during the session was that we found an old harmonium hidden in the studio and we said, ‘Oh, that would be a nice color on it,'” Paul recalled. “We put the chords in with the harmonium like a wash, just a basic held chord, what you would call a pad these days.”

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The song almost replaced another classic Beatles song as a single

Paul analyzed the lyrics to “We Can Work It Out”. “The lyrics could have been personal,” he said. “It’s often a good way to talk to someone or get an idea. It saves you from going to a psychiatrist, you allow yourself to say what you might not say in person.

Initially, “Day Tripper” was supposed to be the Beatles’ next single, but “We Can Work It Out” was deemed more commercial. John objected. Ultimately, “We Can Work It Out” and “Day Tripper” became double A-side singles in the US and UK.

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How ‘We Can Work It Out’ and ‘Day Tripper’ fared on the charts in the US and UK

“We Can Work It Out” topped the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks, remaining on the card for a total of 12 weeks. Meanwhile, “Day Tripper” hit No. 5 and remained on the chart for 10 weeks.

In the UK, “We Can Work It Out” and “Day Tripper” were a double A-side. The Official Map Company says the tracks hit No. 1 for five weeks in the 1960s, staying on the chart for 12 weeks. In 1985 the songs were reissued. Then the tracks peaked at No. 79 and remained on the chart for three weeks.

“We Can Work It Out” has become a bit of a standard. Stevie Wonder, Deep Purple and Big Time Rush were among the artists who recorded the track.

“We Can Work It Out” became a huge hit – and it wouldn’t be the same without George.

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