Nancy Sinatra’s Songwriter Told a Radio Station to Stop Playing 1 of Her Songs

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During the 1960s, Nancy Sinatra released a handful of hit classic rock songs. She collaborated with a country singer on several of them. Notably, the country singer discouraged a radio programmer from playing one of her songs.

Nancy Sinatra | NBCU/NBCUniversal Photo Bank via Getty Images via Getty Images

Nancy Sinatra’s songwriter didn’t understand the meaning of one of the songs he wrote

Lee Hazlewood was a country singer and songwriter. He worked on many of Sinatra’s most famous songs, including “These Boots Are Made for Walkin'”, “Sugar Town”, “Somethin’ Stupid” and “You Only Live Twice”. In a 1999 interview with Index magazinehe discussed a duet he performed with Sinatra called “Some Velvet Morning”.

“‘Some Velvet Morning’ was written for a TV show with Nancy,” he recalled. “It wasn’t meant to be a single, just something for show.” The show in question was the TV special Move with Nancy.

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RELATED: Frank Sinatra’s daughter had a hit song about putting acid in sugar cubes

Why Lee Hazlewood Didn’t Want A Radio Programmer To Play Nancy Sinatra’s “Some Velvet Morning”

Hazlewood recalled what audiences saw when he performed the song on the show with Sinatra. “The good guy was in black on a black horse and the bad girl was in white on a white horse,” Hazlewood said. “We were working with opposites. I didn’t know what I was doing. I still don’t know what this song is about.

Hazlewood revealed that he discouraged a radio programmer from playing “Some Velvet Morning”. “A friend of mine who programmed a hundred radio stations got it on a couple of his big stations in Los Angeles,” Hazlewood recalled. “He would usually stay on a record for a week, and if he didn’t go beyond that he would pull it. But he stayed on it for three weeks, so I called him and said, ‘Forget it. this fucking thing.’ »

Hazlewood explained his actions. “[‘Some Velvet Morning]’wasn’t going anywhere,’ he said. “But he thought it would be a hit and he was right. It took three weeks to hammer it into their heads.

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RELATED: Frank Sinatra refused a James Bond theme song and gave it to his daughter, Nancy Sinatra

How ‘Some Velvet Morning’ Happened in the US and UK

Despite what Hazlewood did, “Some Velvet Morning” became a minor hit in the United States. The track peaked at No. 26 on the Billboard Hot 100. “Some Velvet Morning” lasted on the chart for eight weeks.

“Some Velvet Morning” was not as popular in the UK. According to The Official Map Company, the song is not there. The track appeared on the album Nancy & Lee. Nancy & Lee reached number 17 in the UK and remained on the chart for 13 weeks.

“Some Velvet Morning” became a standard. The artists who covered it are Glenn Danzig, The Webb Brothers and Vanilla Fudge each gave the song their turn. “Some Velvet Morning” is a classic even if Hazlewood didn’t believe it.

RELATED: Frank Sinatra’s Daughter Let Jessica Simpson Cover ‘These Boots Are Made For Walking’ Under 1 Condition

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